I’m not a racist but…

The privilege of not wanting much.

It’s another slow news day, one of the transfer day where the only exciting thing is at the destination rather than on route.

Less than pretty northland township
Less than pretty northland township

This normally means that I get lost in al sort of thoughts and the subject today is something that I’ve been mulling over for a while.

As you by now know I think very highly of this country and in particular of its people but I have noticed that the phrase “I’m not racist but …” comes up in conversation all too often.

Route 3,000,834 – powered by www.bikemap.net


Two of the areas where I have heard it more is in relation with schooling and the effect of Maori presence in the school, and with regard to far eastern immigration, both in terms of running business and in terms of overheating the housing market in Auckland.

A strange but interesting market just past Dargaville

I guess it is natural to make generalisation, and when things are difficult and you see something you want, or you think you’re entitled to, being taken away from you you get upset. When on top of that the culpable of this perceived injustice is a person that, because of some physical attribute, can be identified as the out group, then it is only too easy to generalise and make the whole members of that ethnic group culpable.

Hopefully these problems, that are just a reflection of economical disparity might be corrected by growing prosperity and growing education. While generalisation has been a fundamental tool in the development of humanity, it is serving us badly in the modern world.

I heard about "sweet as" an expression but never seen it on a board.
I heard about “sweet as” an expression but never seen it on a board.
really need to find out what this is.
really need to find out what this is.
This mountain looks like a mountain drawn by a kid, I wonder what made it?
This mountain looks like a mountain drawn by a kid, I wonder what made it?

Enough of that though, and let me tell you abut the highlight of the day, The Kauri Museum.

I had chosen the campsite tonight just based on the proximity to the museum, it’s an understatement to say that I was looking forward to visit it.

The rings on the wall represent the sizes of Kauri trees that actually lived or are still alive.
Most of the Kauri story is about them being cut down for the wood.
This tree was already alive when the first westerners got to New Zealand

The museum did not disappoint with a wealth of information on the kauri and their destiny in New Zealand.

As well as the information on both logging and conservation there was a treasure trove of kauri gum (amber) and I think Tarn would have really enjoyed looking at both the raw nuggets as well as the carved pieces.

Not sure if this was done on purpose or naturally, it looks a little but staged.
This is the biggest kauri gum collection in the world.

Second last night camping in New Zealand and the weather is very good. The campsite is rather empty and I have the lounge all for myself. I’m being told that camping in Australia is even better than New Zealand but on this evidence it is difficult to believe.

Another lovely view for the morning.

One Comment Add yours

  1. julca says:

    Ma che meraviglia lì i campeggi!

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